Health

This Is Why You Must Exercise During Pregnancy

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Exercise improves your muscle tone, strength and endurance, which may make it easier for you to adapt to the changes that pregnancy brings.  It boosts mood, improves sleep, and reduces pregnancy aches and pains. It helps prevent and treat  gestational diabetes and may keep preeclampasia at bay. It prepares you for childbirth by strengthening muscles and building endurance, and makes it much easier to get back in shape after your baby’s born.However, as good as it is, you need to approach it with extra caution. Whether you’re a regular exerciser or you never bothered before, you will need to alter some things to keep you and your baby safe but first you need to check with your doctor first.

Don’t Do Dangerous Sports

Avoid contact sports such as horseback riding, downhill skiing, or mountain biking. Regular cycling early in your pregnancy should be okay if you’re comfortable on a bike, but it’s probably best to stick to stationary or recumbent bikes later in pregnancy.

Don’t exercise on your back

It is important to stop lying flat on your back after the first trimester because it puts pressure on a major vein called the vena cava, which will reduce blood to your heart and may diminish blood flow to your brain and uterus, making you dizzy, short of breath, or nauseated. Some women are comfortable in this position well into their pregnancies, but this isn’t necessarily a good gauge of whether blood flow to the uterus is affected. Placing a pillow under your right hip or buttock will allow you to be almost supine without compressing the vena cava.

Keep moving

Don’t do exercises that need you to stand in one place for prolonged periods like lifting weights or doing yoga because they decrease blood flow to the uterus and cause blood to pool in your legs, making you dizzy. Keep moving by switching positions or walking in place.

 Don’t overdo it

Don’t exercise until you’re exhausted. A good rule of thumb: Slow down if you can’t comfortably carry on a conversation. In general, the best guideline is to listen to your body. When something hurts, that means something’s wrong, so stop. You should feel like you’re working your body, not punishing it.

Don’t get overheated

Avoid letting yourself get too hot, especially during the first trimester when your baby’s major organs are developing. Raising your core temperature above 102 degrees Fahrenheit for more than 10 minutes could harm your baby.  The increased blood flow and higher metabolic rate that happen when you’re pregnant mean you’ll feel warmer than usual, and doubly so when you exercise. And since feeling warm is common in pregnancy, you may get overheated much faster than you normally would, even before your belly is big.

Cool down

At the end of your workout, take five to 10 minutes to walk in place and do some pregnancy-friendly stretching. This will allow your heart rate to get back to normal and help to prevent sore muscles.

Exercise regularly

Make a commitment to work regular exercise into your schedule. Keeping up a routine is easier on your body than long periods of inertia interrupted by spurts of activity. Obstetricians highly recommend 30 minutes or more of moderate exercise every day.

Here Are Some Of The Best Exercises

Walking

One of the best cardiovascular exercises for pregnant women, walking keeps you fit without jarring your knees and ankles. It’s also easy to do almost anywhere, doesn’t require any equipment beyond a good pair of supportive shoes, and is safe throughout all nine months of pregnancy.

Swimming

Healthcare providers and fitness experts hail swimming as the best and safest exercise for pregnant women. Swimming is ideal because it exercises both large muscle groups (arms and legs), provides cardiovascular benefits, and allows expectant women to feel weightless despite the extra pounds of pregnancy.

Aerobics

Low impact aerobics strengthen your heart and tones your body. And if you take a class for pregnant women, you’ll enjoy the camaraderie of other moms-to-be and feel reassured that each movement is safe for you and your baby.

Dancing

You can get your heart pumping by dancing to your favorite tunes in a dance class, but steer clear of routines that call for leaps, jumps, or twirls.

For more go to www.indulgematernityspa.com

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